Category: Cool Science

Penguin Brand Dry Ice has dozens of scientific applications that you can experiment with on your own!

What Is Dry Ice?

For all the seemingly endless wonderment that it brings, many people are not quite sure what it dry ice is. Here is a little “Dry Ice 101” from The Penguin. Let’s start with the basics: dry ice is solid carbon dioxide (CO2). Think back to high school science class—by itself, carbon dioxide is inert, colorless,…

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Dry Ice is a Cool Color Indicator

The Penguin really enjoys science – especially when dry ice is involved! One of his favorite dry ice activities is captured in this video of a chemical demonstration that was conducted at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Check out the video, titled ‘Colorful Indicators’, below: When conducting any science experiments with dry ice, The Penguin urges…

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Who Cut the Dry Ice?

It’s no secret that The Penguin loves science experiments, and there are many that can be conducted in the classroom or at home to exhibit the various unique properties of dry ice. One example utilizes some basic tools found around the home to generate a very interesting effect: These sounds are a common occurrence when…

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Dry Ice Meets Liquid Nitrogen

Dry ice is extremely cold, but did you know that liquid nitrogen is more than 200 degrees colder than dry ice? What would happen if you were to mix liquid nitrogen (at a stunning -346 degrees Fahrenheit) with dry ice? Luckily, we have great science resources over at Frostbite Theater, put on by the Jefferson Lab, to…

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Creating Long-Lasting Fog Effects with Dry Ice

We are often asked why dry ice produces a large amount of fog when water is poured over it. The answer is quite simple, and it’s something that can be a lot of fun to experiment with! The fog that is created comprises  heavy water vapor and sublimated CO2. This vapor is even heavy enough…

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A Stirling Engine Powered by Dry Ice

Besides its standard uses such as cooling and freezing, dry ice has a number of interesting applications. Below is an example of how dry ice can help explain physics and the properties of air temperature: A Stirling Engine operates when a difference in temperature is created between its two conductive base plates. The space between…

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Dry Ice In Medicine

A number of cancer patients have found an interesting new application to maintain some level of comfort and normalcy through the chemotherapy process. In fact, Sharon Arkin of Arizona wrote into us about her experience with the application: I am using dry ice in a procedure to prevent the hair loss associated with chemotherapy. Before, during, and…

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